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Any Major Springsteen Covers

April 27th, 2017 Leave a comment Go to comments

 

When I was 14 I heard Hungry Heart on the radio. It was familiar and yet unlike any other sound I had heard. Looking back, I think it was the keyboards, which I still think are key to giving the E Street Band that distinctive sound (along with Max Weinstein’s booming drumming and, of course, Clarence’s sax). So I heard Hungry Heart and straight after school on a snowy day in February 1981 I rushed to town to find the new LP by this guy Springsteen. On my way home on the bus I could hardly wait to play it. As I held my new purchase, I liked the look of the face that filled the cover. This guy looked like a rock ‘n’ roll Al Pacino. Justice for all!

But before I could play the The River, I had an afternoon appointment with the optician who proceeded to shine a light into my eyes that virtually blinded me for a few hours. How auspicious that on the day my relationship with Bruce Springsteen began, I was blinded by the light.

I played sides 1 and 2 of The River to death. I rarely played the second disc. That first disc was perfect. With time I would become familiar with Bruce’s four previous albums, and come to regard Darkness On The Edge Of Town as one of the greatest LPs ever made. My loyalty to Springsteen began to waver in the 1990s, in as far as I didn’t rush out to buy every new album. But I have most of them.

So I was excited to read Springsteen’s autobiography. My biggest problem with it was the title. Could nobody come up with something less predictable than Born To Run? I like to think the title “Cars And Girls” would have been a great, even if very belated, riposte to the cutting Prefab Sprout song of that title from 1988. But that is my biggest gripe.

True, Bruce at times exceeds the waxing lyrical, and when he goes fan boy with CAPS LOCK switched on he sounds more like his fawning friend Bono than the poet laureate of a generation. But that’s minor quibbling. Born To Run is a welcome extension of the long prologues to songs in his concerts (usually The River). He is at once fully aware of his genius as he is also genuinely self-deprecating. Here is a man who knows his strengths and his limitations, and how to balance them. He knows his value and has no need for false modesty, even when he explains why he took the decision to be the boss of his backing band, the E Street Band. Incidentally, he says that he doesn’t like the nickname “The Boss”, much as Sinatra hated being called “Chairman of the Board”. I wonder what Bono calls Springsteen…

Born To Run mostly confirms that with Bruce, what you see is indeed what you get…mostly. I didn’t know about his battles with depression, and commend him for speaking about them with such honesty. I did know that Springsteen is a funny guy. Some of his songs are good comedy; take, for example, Sherry Darling. The book has some laugh-out-loud moments, such as when he describes his moves with Courtney Cox in the Dancing In The Dark video as “white-man boogaloo” and “dad dancing”.

Springsteen mentions a few memorable concerts he has played. To my delight, all three Springsteen gigs I have attended are included. His Wembley concert on 4 July 1985 might be the best of any act I have seen.

But I don’t want to write a book report on Born To Run, much as I recommend it. It rather serves as an intro to the mix I am presenting here: of covers of Springsteen songs. And it might seem easy to cover Springsteen. Manfred Mann’s Earth Band did so with Blinded By The Light. Patti Smith had a hit with Because The Night, and The Pointer Sisters with Fire. But Mann had his hit before Springsteen was famous, and our man hadn’t yet recorded the Smith or Pointer Sisters hits (the latter itself a cover of a record by Springsteen pal Robert Gordon, who sang it like Elvis might have).

It’s quite different covering Springsteen songs after Springsteen has recorded them, almost invariably producing the definitive version (differently to Bob Dylan). That is, I suppose, why so few dare to do that. It’s a risk, and it doesn’t always pay off. So, in absence of an abundance of any more quality choices, there most certainly will be no second mix of Springsteen covers.

As ever, the mix is timed to fit on a standard CD-R and includes home-bossed covers. PW in comments.

1. Frankie Goes To Hollywood – Born To Run (1984)
2. Nils Lofgren – Wreck On The Highway (1997)
3. The Band – Atlantic City (1993)
4. The Hollies – 4th Of July Asbury Park (Sandy) (1975)
5. Everything But The Girl – Tougher Than The Rest (1992)
6. Emmylou Harris – The Price You Pay (1981)
7. Cowboy Junkies – Thunder Road (2004)
8. Justin Townes Earle – Glory Days (2014)
9. John Wesley Harding – Jackson Cage (1997)
10. Raul Malo – Downbound Train (2000)
11. Patty Griffin – Stolen Car (2001)
12. Townes Van Zandt – Racing In The Streets (1992)
13. Richie Havens – Streets Of Philadelphia (1997)
14. Minnie Driver – Hungry Heart (2004)
15. Greg Kihn – For You (1977)
16. David Bowie – It’s Hard To Be A Saint In The City (1989)
17. PJ Proby – I’m On Fire (1990)
18. Natalie Cole – Pink Cadillac (1987)
19. Big Daddy – Dancing In The Dark (1985)
20. The Flying Pickets – Factory (1984)

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  1. April 27th, 2017 at 15:02 | #1

    I’m always interested in people’s point of entry for any artist. Sometimes one bounces off the obvious material, but then discovers a deep cut, or a story in an anthology, or the like. Finding out about Springsteen via The River is an interesting one– it is a collection where his work took a significant turn, I think.

    Thanks for these, and for all your work

  2. rekkids
    April 27th, 2017 at 17:00 | #2

    Thank you.

  3. April 27th, 2017 at 18:17 | #3

    Nice set. The Havens and Hollies are favorites of mine. Some of them, I don’t know. I had a copy long ago of the Frankie Goes To Hollywood album but I utterly don’t recall “Born To Run” on it. Thanks much for this!

  4. George
    April 29th, 2017 at 10:01 | #4

    AT the blog charitychicmusic there’s a running series of Springsteen versus a cover version, runs on saturdays.

  5. halfwit
    April 29th, 2017 at 19:00 | #5

    Nice recent Desert Island Disc interview with Springsteen in which he talks about his difficult childhood & bouts of depression (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006qnmr).

    Beware: once you’re in the site you may never come out (!) – there’s tons of interviews freely available… amongst the musicians: Springsteen, Keith Richards, Brian Eno, Randy Newman, Roger Waters, Morrissey, Elvis Costello; some others: Ricky Gervais, Peter Ustinov, Tennessee Williams.

  6. JohnnyDiego
    April 29th, 2017 at 23:32 | #6

    I’ve never been a Springsteen fan but P.J. Proby makes this worthwhile. Can’t too much P.J.

  7. halfhearteddude
    April 30th, 2017 at 11:18 | #7

    I love Desert Island Discs. Pity they can’t play the full songs though.

  8. Stinky
    April 30th, 2017 at 13:58 | #8

    I really enjoyed this post, and (as always) I look forward to hearing your compilation. – Stinky

  9. halfwit
    April 30th, 2017 at 20:19 | #9

    @halfhearteddude
    No worries, they play just enough for me to procure the full versions.

  10. halfhearteddude
    May 1st, 2017 at 10:16 | #10

    I had downloaded and played about 30 previously. After your comment, I go 50 more…

  11. halfwit
    May 1st, 2017 at 11:26 | #11

    Wow, the above mentions are pretty much all I’ve got so far.

    How about a Best Desert Island Discs comp. down the line?

    These are great to listen to while running – you hardly notice your bursting lungs. West African music too, as suggested by Eno.

  12. RhodB
    May 5th, 2017 at 22:35 | #12

    Appreciate the great effort

    Regards

    Rhod

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