Beatles Recovered – Yellow Submarine

January 14th, 2019 7 comments

Coming just over six weeks after the release of the White Album, The Beatles released the soundtrack LP for the animated Yellow Submarine movie on 13 January 1969. Its release exactly fifty years ago yesterday was not massively popular, partly since Side 2 comprised only George Martin instrumentals, and in any case, it was always going to be overshadowed by the epoch-making double album.

The Beatles weren’t too keen either; they put together their contribution only because of a contractual obligation to United Artists, which was releasing the film.

Two of the six songs on Side 1 had been previously released on single (All You Need Is Love and the title track). George Harrison’s sarcastic Only A Northern Song was recorded during the Sgt Pepper’s sessions in February 1967, but rejected for that album.

All Together Now, which McCartney called “a throw-away track”, was recorded in May 1967 for the film project, as was John Lennon’s Hey Bulldog, recorded in February 1968. May 1967 also saw the recording of Harrison’s LSD-influenced It’s All Too Much.

A song that might have been included was Across The Universe, which was first recorded in February 1968, then appeared in its original version on a charity album in 1969, and then in a rearranged form on Let It Be in 1970.

A cover of Across The Universe, by folkie/poet Rod McKuen, is included in this collection of covers, as part of a putative Side 2, which might also have included single tracks and their b-sides that were released in 1968.

Ella Fitzgerald gives Hey Jude a whole new treatment (it was on the b-side of her cover of Sunshine Of Your Love by Cream), as does Richie Havens on his cover of Lady Madonna.

The most interesting interpretation here, however, is the jazzy slow-burn by Jimmy McGriff and Junior Parker of Harrison’s The Inner Light, which divests the song of its Indian sound.

Of the Side 1 stuff, it’s rather unexpected to have hirsute Tony Soprano-favourites Journey cover the formerly druggy It’s All Too Much, with a hard-rocking guitar solo.

But most surprising — other than a soul band deciding to cover the banal Yellow Submarine — is the fine version here of the otherwise pedestrian (and annoying) All Together Now by German soul band Joy Unlimited. The group was fronted by the late Joy Fleming, who had a mighty and soulful voice which the bland pretenders of the likes of Adele would kill for. And the band strips the Beatles song of its triteness and infuses it with a gospel vibe, supported by Fleming’s committed ad libbing.

I’ve posted Elvis Costello’s Live Aid version of All You Need Is Love before. Oddly, there aren’t many very good covers of that song.

One Beatles performance is included here. Not Guilty was one of several songs recorded during the White Album sessions that were rejected for inclusion. Those tracks were pretty bad; Not Guilty is the least bad of the lot.

1. The Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band – Yellow Submarine (1967)
2. Sun Dial – Only A Northern Song (1991)
3. Joy Unlimited – All Together Now (1970)
4. Bill Deal & The Rhondels – Hey Bulldog (1970)
5. Journey – It’s All Too Much (1976)
6. Elvis Costello – All You Need Is Love (1985)
7. Ella Fitzgerald – Hey Jude (1968)
8. Jimmy McGriff & Junior Parker – The Inner Light (1970)
9. Richie Havens – Lady Madonna (1968)
10. Rod McKuen – Nothing’s Gonna Change My World (Across The Universe) (1971)
11. The Beatles – Not Guilty (1968)
12. Sesame Street – Yellow Submarine (1976)

GET IT!
(Link updated. PW in comments)

 

The McKuen track is damaged on the mix. Get the proper version here.

 

More great Beatles stuff:
Beatles Recovered: A Hard Day’s Night
Beatles Recovered: Beatles For Sale
Beatles Recovered: Help!
Beatles Recovered: Rubber Soul
Beatles Recovered: Revolver
Beatles Recovered: Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club  Band
Beatles Revovered: Magical Mystery Tour
Beatles Recovered: White Album
Wordless: Any Major Beatles Instrumentals
Covered With Soul Vol. 14 – Beatles Edition 1
Covered With Soul Vol. 15 – Beatles Edition 2

Any Major Beatles Covers: 1962-66

Any Major Beatles Covers: 1967-68
Any Major Beatles Covers: 1968-70
Any Bizarre Beatles
Beatles – Album tracks and B-Sides Vol. 1
Beatles – Album tracks and B-Sides Vol. 2
Beatles Reunited: Everest (1971)
Beatles Reunited: Live ’72 (1972)
Beatles Reunited: Smile Away (1972)
Beatles Reunited: Photographs (1974)

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Any Major Favourites 2018 – Vol. 2

January 10th, 2019 2 comments

 

This is the second compilation of tracks that appeared on mixes posted in 2018, with links to the particular posts — just in case you missed something good. The first mix is here.

As mentioned in the first volume of the 2018 retrospective, the coming year will see quite a few posts on The Originals. There will be two Beatles Recovered mixes, the first of which will run within the next few days. And a whole lot of other fine stuff.

Thank you to all the people who post comments. They are the oxygen for this endeavour.

This year I’m thinking of taking the step of asking readers for some support in covering the costs of hosting this site. I’m still considering the best way of doing that; I just want to cover the costs, rather than receive remuneration for what is really a labour of love, so something like Patreon wouldn’t seem most suitable. Your good ideas in that regard would be very welcome.

But in the meantime, enjoy this mix of great songs, which is timed to fit on as standard CD-R (though this time without covers). PW in comments.

1. The Main Ingredient – Everybody Plays The Fool (1972)
Any Major Soul Train

2. Odyssey – Native New Yorker (1977)
NYC – Any Major Mix Vol. 2

3. The Dells – Oh, What A Night (1969)
Any Major Music from ‘The Sopranos’ Vol. 1

4. Mel Tormé – Blue Moon (1960)
Song Swarm: Blue Moon

5. Elvis Presley – If I Can Dream (1968)
Any Major MLK

6. Johnny Cash – Roll Call (1967)
Any Major Jones Vol. 2

7. The Hollies – Bus Stop (1966)
Any Major ABC: 1960s

8. Mott The Hoople – All The Way From Memphis (1973)
Any Major Music From The Wonder Years

9. Commander Cody – Cry Baby Cry (1978)
Beatles Recovered: White Album

10. Emmylou Harris – Racing In The Streets (1982)
Great Covers: Darkness On The Edge Of Town

11. Bright Eyes – First Day Of My Life (2005)
Stars Pick Your Songs Vol. 3: Celebs

12. Karma – Pachelbel (1998)
Any Major Impossible Love

13. Michael Kiwanuka – Cold Little Heart (2017)
Any Major TV Theme Songs Vol. 4

14. Camelle Hinds – Sausalito Calling (1995)
Any Major Flute Vol. 5

15. Fatima Rayney – Hey (1997)
Any Major Happy Songs Vol. 1

16. Stevie Wonder – Knocks Me Off My Feet (1976)
Any Major Soul 1976 Vol. 2

17. Isaac Hayes – I’ll Never Fall In Love Again (1972)
Covered With Soul Vol. 23

18. Ben E. King – Tonight I’ll Be Staying Here With You (1970)
Any Major Dylan Covers Vol. 5

19. Labi Siffre – It Must Be Love (1971)
Any Major Originals: The 1980s

20. Abba – Waterloo (German version, 1974)
Stars Sing German

https://rapidgator.net/file/671151c8d75c7b9dacb0f97a99f71ed1/fave18_2.rar.html

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In Memoriam – December 2018

January 3rd, 2019 4 comments

The relatively benign year 2018 (in terms of music deaths) ended with a vengeful bang. Most distressing was the death of three members of a band that was swept to sea in the Indonesian tsunami while as they were playing live on stage. It was a bad month too for guitarists. And an old correspondent with yours truly, a legendary songwriter, also exited the musical stage.

The All-Rounder

It may be that Nancy Wilson’s versatility prevented the jazz, soul and pop singer from becoming a legend in any of these genres. Her talent and her powers of interpreting other people’s songs should qualify her as a Queen of Soul or Duchess of Jazz. But the singer herself insisted on not being confined to any one genre. She described herself as a “song stylist”. Wilson had crossover potential. She even hosted her own TV show, imaginatively titled, The Nancy Wilson Show, which won an Emmy, but for some reason ran only from 1967-68. She also acted in several TV series. Wilson had a long career, still winning a Grammy in 2007 for her last album, Turned To Blue.

The Patch

After pursuing an unsuccessful music career in his native Alabama, in 1967 Ray Sawyer drove to Oregon to become a logger. On the way there he had a car accident in which he lost an eye. That was the end of the logging career and Sawyer returned to music, eventually helping to form a band — which would be called Dr Hook & the Medicine Show in reference to his piratesque eye cap. Although for much of the band’s existence Sawyer was not the main lead singer — that was Dennis Locorriere — Sawyer was the visual focal point of the band, even when he stood to the side in group photos. Of course, many people assumed that Sawyer was Dr Hook himself. Locorriere took the lead vocals on almost all of the band’s big hits, but Sawyer did the honours on Shel Silverstein’s The Cover Of The Rolling Stone — which landed the band on the cover of the magazine, in cartoon form. Sawyer left Dr Hook in 1981 for a solo career.

The Close And Personal Friend

The famed songwriter Norman Gimbel once wrote me a grumpy e-mail, objecting to my having repeated the story that his lyrics for Killing Me Softly With His Song were basically the work of Lori Lieberman. I can’t say that I found him to be a particularly sweet man, still, he took the time to write. He did decline my offer of an interview, which was his prerogative. Gimbel leaves an impressive legacy. Apart from Killing Me Softly, he also wrote the words for the themes of Happy Days and Laverne & Shirley (whose Penny Marshall died just two days before Gimbel), Andy Williams’ Canadian Sunset, and the English lyrics for The Girl Of Ipanema and Sway. He won an Oscar for the song It Goes Like It Goes from 1979’s Norma Rae, and in 1984 was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame.

The Hitmaker

I paid tribute to the legendary Wrecking Crew bassist Joe Osborn with a mix posted a couple of days after his death. The post noted the number of massive hits Osborn played on; among the Wrecking Crew bassists, maybe only Carol Kaye can match his resumé. When a Wrecking Crew alumnus dies, it is always good to refer to the outstanding 2008 documentary The Wrecking Crew, produced by the son Osborne’s frequent collaborator Tommy Tedesco, which I believe is available on Netflix. On top of the four songs included here, Osborn also features on the bass on the featured tribute to Galt MacDermot, The 5th Dimension’s Aquarius/Let The Sunshine In.

The Punk Pioneer

Few rock legends, it’s fair to say, tend to retire to Estonia. But so it was with Pete Shelley, who with his Estonian wife moved to the capital Tallinn in 2012, and died there at the age of 63 of a heart attack on December 6. Shelley was the frontman of the pioneering English punk band Buzzcocks, which issued tracks with titles like Orgasm Addict, which came out in 1977 at a time when Yes Sir I Can Boogie was the UK #1. The Buzzcocks charted only as of 1978, after co-founder Howard Devoto had left the band. The band’s impact was greater than the double-digit chart placings would suggest. The band split in 1981, and Shelley embarked on a solo career.

The Heartbroken Cowboy

One of the great verses in the canon of popular music songs about heartbreak is this: “I can hardly bear the sight of lipstick on the cigarettes there in the ashtray, lyin’ cold the way you left ’em. But at least your lips caressed them, while you packed.” The man who wrote this, A Good Year For The Roses, and so many other songs of broken and yearning hearts, was Jerry Chesnut, who has died at 87. Other Chesnut hits included D-I-V-O-R-C-E, It’s Four In The Morning, Looking at the World Through A Windshield, and T-R-O-U-B-L-E. Chesnut came from the coalmining community of Harlan Country in Kentucky, so he knew about the evil ways of the bosses. This found expression in the Johnny Cash hit Oney.

The Ripped-off Guitarist

The career of Jody Williams is a tale of exploited but unrecognised talent. Williams was one of the most influential blues guitarists of the 1950s (the solo on Bo Diddley’s Who Do You Love is regarded by many as one of the greatest in blues), but few knew his name because his session work was not credited. But others cheerfully stole the riffs he created for their own records. Things came to a head when the riff he created for Billy Stewart’s 1956 track Billy’s Blues was copied by Mickey Baker for Mickey & Sylvia’s hit Love Is Strange. A court case brought no joy, and Williams, tired of getting ripped off, slowly faded from the record industry. By the end of the 1960s he had found a new career as a Xerox technician.

The Elvis Friend

The same day as Williams went, another pioneer of the blues guitar left us. Calvin Newborn played on the very first session by young B.B. King in 1949 and taught Howlin’ Wolf the guitar. He was a close friend of the young Elvis Presley for a while. In 1951 he toured with Ike Turner, whose Rocket 88 had just been released under the moniker of the record’s vocalist, Jackie Brenston and the Delta Cats. Newborn also recorded with Ike. Later Calvin Newborn and is brother Phineas drifted more towards jazz. Newborn toured and/or recorded with the likes of Lionel Hampton, Lou Donaldson, Jimmy Forrest, Hank Crawford, Jimmy Witherspoon and Sun Ra.

The Wicked Game Guitarist

A few months ago, James Calvin Wilsey featured for his string-plucking skills on the Any Major Guitar Vol. 2 mix, for his work on Chris Isaak’s Blue Hotel. Wilsey also played the haunting guitar on Isaak’s Wicked Game. Before all that, he was the bassist for the San Francisco-based punk band Avengers. Isaak’s music was closer to his background than California punk: born in the backseat of a Greyhound bus, he grew up in Kentucky.

The Tsunami victims

It is often said that the best death for a musician is when it happens whole on stage performing. This probably cannot be said for Herman Sikumbang, Muhammad “Bani” Awal Purbani and Windu Andi Darmawan, guitarist, bassist and drummer respectively of Indonesian pop band Seventeen, who fell victim to the Sunda Strait tsunami on December 22. The band was playing a private concert in a tent at Tanjung Lesung resort when the giant wave hit them from behind. Only lead singer Riefian “Ifan” Fajarsyah survived being swept out to sea by holding on to a floating box. The tsunami also killed 29 audience members, the band’s crew manager and the singer’s wife, actress Dylan Sahara. Bassist Bani is survived by his three-year-old daughter and pregnant wife. The band was formed in 1999 when all the members were 17; hence their name. They released six albums.

Indonesian band Seventeen, which lost three of its four members in a tsunami while playing live on stage.

 

Roger V. Burton, 90, jazz musician and actor, on Nov. 30

Jody Williams, 83, blues guitarist, on Dec .1
Bo Diddley – Who Do You Love (1956, on guitar)
Billy Stewart feat. Jody Williams – Billy’s Blues (Part. 1) (1956, on guitar)
Jody Williams – Lucky Lou (1957)

Calvin Newborn, 85, jazz and blues guitarist, on Dec. 1
B.B.King – When Your Baby Packs Up And Goes (1949)
Bonnie & Ike Turner – Lookin’ For My Baby (1952)
Hank Crawford & Calvin Newborn – Frame For The Blue (1980)

Perry Robinson, 80, jazz clarinetist and composer, on Dec. 2

Carl Janelli, 91, jazz saxophonist and clarinetist, on Dec. 3

Ramsay Mackay, 73, bassist and songwriter of South African band Freedom’s Children, on Dec. 4
Freedom’s Children – Kafkasque (1969)

Pete Shelley, 63, singer, guitarist and songwriter with UK punk band Buzzcocks, on Dec. 6
Buzzcocks – Ever Fallen In Love (With Someone You Shouldn’t’ve) (1978)
Buzzcocks – Everybody’s Happy Nowadays (1979)
Pete Shelley – Blue Eyes (1986)

John Ace’ Cannon, 84, soul saxophonist, on Dec. 6
Ace Cannon – Tuff (1962)
Ace Cannon – By The Time I Get To Phoenix (1968)

Floyd Parton, 61, country songwriter, on Dec. 6
Dolly Parton & Ricky Van Shelton – Rockin’ Years (1991, as writer)

Lucas Starr, 34, bassist of metalcore bands Oh, Sleeper, Terminal, on Dec. 7

The Mascara Snake, 70, artist and musician (Captain Beefheart), in car crash on Dec. 7
Captain Beefheart & His Magic Band – Pena (1969, spoken voice)

Fred Wieland, 75, guitarist of Australian bands Strangers, Mixtures, announced on Dec. 10
The Strangers – Fever (1966)

Angelo Conti, 62, singer of Italian ska-punk band Banda Bassotti, on Dec. 11
Banda Bassotti – El Quinto Regimiento (2003)

Nancy Wilson, 81, jazz and soul singer, on Dec. 13
Nancy Wilson – The Best Is Yet To Come (1964)
Nancy Wilson – The Greatest Performance Of My Life (1973, live)
Nancy Wilson – This Time Last Summer (1975)
Nancy Wilson – Take Love Easy (2006)

Emmit Powell, 84, gospel singer and disc jockey, on Dec. 14
The Emmit Powell Gospel Elites – If You Can Make It (1983)

Joe Osborn, 81, session bass guitarist of The Wrecking Crew, on Dec. 14
Brenda Lee – Here Comes That Feeling (1962, as co-writer)
Johnny Rivers – You Dig (1966, on bass)
Glen Campbell – Gentle On My Mind (1967, on bass)
Mama Cass Elliot – Make Your Own Kind Of Music (1969, on bass)
Olivia Newton-John – Sam (1977, on bass)

Jerry Chesnut, 87, country songwriter, on Dec. 15
Jerry Chesnut – Small Enough To Crawl (1969)
Faron Young – It’s Four In The Morning (1972, as writer)
Johnny Cash – Oney (1973, as writer)
Elvis Presley – T-R-O-U-B-L-E (1975, as writer)

Arthur Maia, 56, Brazilian bassist and composer, on Dec. 15
Arthur Maia – Luanda Funk (1990)

Anca Pop, 34, Romanian-Canadian singer-songwriter, in car crash on Dec. 17

Galt MacDermot, 89, Canadian pianist and composer (Hair), on Dec. 17
Galt MacDermot – Hair (1968)
The 5th Dimension – Aquarius/Let The Sunshine In (1969, as co-writer)

Norman Gimbel, 91, songwriter & halfhearted pal, on Dec. 19
Rosemary Clooney/Perez Prado – Sway (1960, as lyricist)
Getz/Gilberto – Girl From Ipanema (1963, as lyricist)
Pratt & McClain – Happy Days (1976, as lyricist)
Jennifer Warnes – It Goes Like It Goes (1979, as lyricist)
Luther Vandross – Killing Me Softly (1994, as lyricist)

Herman Sikumbang, 36, guitarist of Indonesian pop band Seventeen, on Dec. 22
Muhammad ‘Bani’ Awal Purbani, bassist of Indonesian pop band Seventeen, on Dec. 22
Windu Andi Darmawan, drummer of Indonesian pop band Seventeen, on Dec. 22

Jimmy Work, 94, country singer-songwriter, on Dec. 22
Kitty Wells – Making Believe (1955, as writer)
Jimmy Work – Tennessee Border (1959)

Honey Lantree, 75, drummer of English pop group The Honeycombs, on Dec. 23
The Honeycombs – Have I The Right (1964)

James Calvin Wilsey, 61, guitarist and bassist, on Dec. 24
Avengers – We Are The One (1977, on bass)
Chris Isaak – Wicked Game (1991, on guitar)
James Wilsey – Untamed

Jerry Riopelle, 77, American musician, on Dec. 24
The Parade – Sunshine Girl (1967, as member and co-writer)
Jerry Riopelle – Walkin’ On Water (1975)

Guto Barros, 61, guitarist and songwriter of Brazilian rock band Blitz, on Dec. 25

Miúcha, 81, Brazilian bossa nova singer and composer, on Dec. 27
Miúcha & Tom Jobim – Tiro Cruzado (1977)

June Whitfield, 93, English actress and occasional recording artist, on Dec. 28
Frankie Howerd & June Whitfield – Up Je Taime (1971)

Mike Taylor, member of Canadian covers band Walk off the Earth, on Dec. 29

Dean Ford, 72, songwriter and singer of Scottish pop band Marmalade, on Dec. 31
(News reached me too late to include a tribute. Coming next month)

Ray Sawyer, 81, singer with Dr Hook & the Medicine Show, on Dec. 31
Dr Hook & the Medicine Show – Cover Of The Rolling Stone (1972)
Ray Sawyer – Maybe I Could Use That In A Song

https://rapidgator.net/file/b16251cc5787c714f3804b89656ff2c5/IM_1812.rar.html
(PW in comments)

Previous In Memoriams

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Any Major Favourites 2018 – Vol. 1

January 1st, 2019 2 comments

As I have done for the past few years, I am putting up two compilations of tracks from the compilations I posted over the past year, with one song chosen from each mix (except for the Any Major Favourites 2017 mixes, the Christmas selections, the Any Major Disco Vol. 7 mix I posted just before New Year’s, and In Memoriams).

In 2018 I put up a total of 46 mixes, plus the 12 monthly In Memoriams. Among those 46 mixes were the first three in the series of The Originals – lesser-known originals of famous hits, sorted by themes. I plan to post more of these this year. And the supply of these lesser-known originals is endless; my collection numbers more than 800 of them.

As always, the mix is timed to fit on a CD-R length. I’ve not bothered with home-distilled covers for this offering. PW in comments, where you are always welcome to say something.

1. Rodriguez – I Wonder (1970)
Any Major ABC: 1970s

2. The Allman Brothers Band – Blue Sky (1972)
Any Major Guitar Vol. 2

3. Steely Dan – Kid Charlemagne (1976)
The Larry Carlton Collection

4. Jackson Browne – Somebody’s Baby (1982)
Not Feeling Guilty Mix Vol. 9

5. Aretha Franklin – Something He Can Feel (1976)
Aretha Sings Covers

6. Thelma Houston – I Just Gotta Be Me (1969)
The Joe Osborne Collection

7. Darondo – Didn’t I (1972)
Any Major Music from ‘The Deuce’

8. Gil Scott-Heron – New York City (1976)
Any Major New York City Vol. 1

9. Badfinger – Without You (1970)
Any Major Originals: The 1970s

10. John Lennon – Nobody Loves You (When You’re Down And Out) (1974)
Beatles Reunited: Photographs

11. Wilco – Impossible Germany (2007)
Any Major Guitar Vol. 1

12. Andre Williams – Pardon Me (I’ve Got Someone To Kill) (2000)
Any Major Murder Songs Vol. 1

13. Ben Kweller – On Her Own (2009)
Any Major Women Vol. 1

14. Garth Brooks – Friends In Low Places (1990)
Any Major Friends Vol. 1

15. Roy Clark – Thank God And Greyhound (1972)
All The People Who’ve Died 2018

16. Lovin’ Spoonful – Daydream (1966)
Any Major Whistle Vol. 2

17. Jerry Jeff Walker – Mr. Bojangles (1968)
The Originals: The Classics

18. Earth, Wind & Fire – I’ll Write A Song For You (1977)
Any Major Soul 1977

19. Pacific Express – Give A Little Love (1978)
Any Major Soul 1978

20. Vicky Leandros – L’amour Est Bleu (Love Is Blue) (1966)
Any Major Eurovision

https://rapidgator.net/file/704038b815e2729766169220da6a7fa9/fave18_1.rar.html

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Any Major Disco Vol. 7 – Party Like It’s 1978

December 27th, 2018 1 comment

As every year, we close the year with a disco mix for that New Year’s Eve party — and it’s good even if it just involves you dancing in the kitchen, cooking up a good meal to see out the old year to greet the last year of the current decade (yeah, I know!).

This year you can party with the halfhearted dude like it’s 1978: every track here was released or was a hit in that year, 40 years ago. It’s fair to bet that a good number of the people who partied to these tunes back when they were new can still shake their booty in an appropriate manner, dodgy hips and inflamed joints be damned.

Some of the songs have run here before, particularly in the Any Major Funk series.

And with that I wish you a good slide into 2019. May it be a year of fulfilled dreams, good fortune and excellent health for us all!

As ever, CD-R length, home-downboogied covers, PW in comments.

1. Thelma Houston – Saturday Night
2. Cheryl Lynn – Got To Be Real
3. Earth, Wind & Fire – September
4. Sister Sledge – He’s The Greatest Dancer
5. Gloria Gaynor – Anybody Wanna Party
6. Eruption – I Can’t Stand The Rain
7. Sylvester – You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real)
8. Gibson Brothers – Cuba
9. Chic – Le Freak
10. Chanson – Don’t Hold Back
11. Jimmy ‘Bo’ Horne – Dance Across The Floor
12. Gene Chandler – Get Down
13. Third World – Now That We’ve Found Love
14. Con Funk Shun – Shake and Dance With Me
15. Instant Funk – I Got My Mind Made Up
16. Diana Ross & Michael Jackson – Ease On Down The Road
17. Stargard – Theme From ‘Which Way Is Up’
18. Hi-Tension – Hi-Tension
19. Taste Of Honey – Boogie Oogie Oogie
20. Donna Summer – Last Dance

GET IT!

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All The People Who’ve Died 2018

December 20th, 2018 5 comments

 

 

For the second year running, the Grim Reaper has taken it relatively easy, giving us more relief after the trauma of annus horribilis 2016. Still, we lost some young talent in artists like the Swedish House musician Avicii, we observed tragedy as we did in the death at 46 of The Cranberries’ Dolores O’Riordan. As every year, there are some fallen giants, most notable of them Aretha Franklin, Hugh Masekela, Charles Aznavour and Elvis’ drummer, DJ Fontana.

As every year, here is a selection of the most notable deaths of the year (which, for our present purposes runs from December to the end of November, so it excludes people like Pete Shelley or Joe Osborn; the latter has been honoured with a special mix), sorted in Top 10s or Top 5s within various categories. These lists might exclude names you might have included; those names will have featured in the monthly In Memoriam round-ups.

To go with these lists is, by way of tribute, a mix of music by some of the big musicians who have died in 2018. As last year, I’ll limit myself to people who were in the featured band or performed solo, so no songwriters, producers or session musicians will feature, even if the body of their contributions was weighty. The tracklisting follows further down.


Here then are the names we should expect to see at the Grammys when some semi-lisping thongbird croons a slowed-down version of whatever the latest rediscovered classic song will be. Personally, I’d be pleased if they just played the Jim Carroll Band song that gave this post and playlist its name. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xAKoU_W_mf8)

 

POP/ROCK
D.J. Fontana
, 87, rock & roll drummer (Elvis Presley), on June 13
Mark E. Smith, 60, English songwriter, singer and leader of The Fall, on Jan. 24
Nokie Edwards, 82, lead guitarist with The Ventures, on March 12
Dolores O’Riordan, 46, singer of Irish band The Cranberries, on Jan. 15
Tony Joe White, 75, American singer-songwriter, on Oct. 24
Marty Balin, 76, co-lead singer of Jefferson Airplane/Starship, on Sept. 27
‘Fast’ Eddie Clarke, 67, British heavy metal guitarist, on Jan. 10
Alan Longmuir, 70, founder of the Bay City Rollers, on July 2
Ray Thomas, 76, songwriter, co-founder of The Moody Blues, on Jan. 4
Vinnie Paul, 54, founding drummer of heavy metal band Pantera, on June 22
Ed King, 68, guitarist of Lynyrd Skynyrd, Strawberry Alarm Clock, on Aug. 22
Danny Kirwan, 68, British guitarist (Fleetwood Mac 1968-72), on June 8

SOUL/FUNK/GOSPEL/HIP HOP/DANCE
Aretha Franklin
, 76, soul and gospel singer, songwriter, pianist, on Aug. 16
Dennis Edwards
, 74, soul singer (The Temptations), on Feb. 1
Denise LaSalle, 78, soul and blues singer, on Jan. 8
John ‘Jabo’ Starks, 79, drummer with James Brown’s J.B.s, on May 1
Avicii, 28, Swedish house musician, producer and DJ, on April 20
Edwin Hawkins, 74, American gospel musician, on Jan. 15
Clarence Fountain, 88, founding member of The Blind Boys of Alabama, on June 3
Danny Woods, 73, co-founder of soul group Chairmen of the Board, on January 13
Barbara Alston, 74, singer with The Crystals, on Feb. 16
Yvonne Staples, 80, baritone singer with The Staple Singers, on April 10
Lovebug Starski, 57, rapper and DJ, on Feb. 8

COUNTRY/FOLK
Roy Clark, 85, country singer and presenter of TV show Hee Haw, on Nov. 15
Chas Hodges
, 74, half of English duo Chas & Dave, on Sept. 22
Randy Scruggs
, 64, country guitarist, producer, songwriter, on April 17
Roy Bailey, 83, English folk singer, on Nov. 20
Freddie Hart, 91, country musician and songwriter, on Oct. 27

JAZZ/EASY LISTENING
Hugh Masekela
, 78, South African jazz trumpeter, on Jan. 23
Vic Damone, 89, crooner, on Feb. 11
Keely Smith
, 89, jazz singer, on Dec. 16
Cecil Taylor, 89, pioneering free jazz pianist and poet, on April 5
Randy Weston, 92, jazz pianist and composer, on Sept. 1

BLUES/REGGAE
Trevor McNaughton
, 77, singer with Jamaican reggae band The Melodians, on Nov. 20
Lazy Lester
, 85, blues musician, on Aug. 22
Otis Rush, 84, blues guitarist and singer, on Sept. 29
Irvin Jarrett
, 69, percussionist of reggae band Third World, on July 31
Norris Weir, 72, singer of rocksteady band The Jamaicans and gospel singer, on Nov. 16

 NON-ENGLISH POP
Charles Aznavour
, 94, French-Armenian singer, on Oct. 1
Johnny Hallyday
, 74, French rock singer and actor, on Dec. 6
France Gall, 70, French singer, on Jan. 7
Abi Ofarim, 80, Israeli musician, on May 4
Jacques Higelin
, 77, French pop singer, on April 6
Lys Assia
, 94, Swiss singer, inaugural Eurovision Song Contest winner, on March 24
Jürgen Marcus, 69, German Schlager singer, on May 29
Lill-Babs, 80, Swedish singer and actress, on April 3
Rim Banna, 51, Palestinian singer, composer and activist, on March 24
Rose Laurens, 65, French singer and songwriter, on April 30

SESSION PLAYERS
Matt Murphy
, 88, blues/soul guitarist, on June 14
Melvin ‘Wah Wah Watson’ Ragin, 67, session guitarist, on Oct. 24
Leon ‘Ndugu’ Chancler
, 65, session drummer, on Feb. 3
Eddie Willis, 82, guitarist with The Funk Brothers, on Aug. 20
Max Bennett, 90, Wrecking Crew and jazz bassist, on Sept. 14

COMPOSERS/SONGWRITERS
Francis Lai, 86, French film score composer, on Nov. 7
Ron Dunbar, 77, soul songwriter, on April 3
John Morris, 91, film composer, on Jan. 24
Dominic Frontiere, 86, film & TV composer, arranger, on Dec. 21
Scott English, 81, songwriter and producer, on Nov. 16

PRODUCTION
Geoff Emerick
, 72, English recording engineer, on Oct. 2
Reggie Lucas, 65, producer, guitarist and songwriter, May 19
Matt Dike, 55, hip hop producer, writer, mixer, label executive, on March 13
Tony Hiller, 91, British songwriter and producer, on Aug. 26
Patrick Williams, 79, film/TV and jazz composer, arranger and conductor, on July 25

MOVERS & SHAKERS
Rick Hall
, 85, producer, songwriter, owner of FAME Studios, on Jan. 2
Kooster McAllister
, 67, live engineer, co-owner of Record Plant mobile studio, on March 23
Glenn Snoddy, 96, engineer and inventor of the fuzz guitar pedal, on May 19
Adrian Cronauer, 79, radio disc jockey, on July 18
Dieter ‘Thomas’ Heck, 80, legendary German music TV host, on Aug. 23

 

And here’s the mix. As ever: CD-R lengths, lively covers, PW in comments.

1. Elvis Presley – Ready Teddy (D.J. Fontana; 1956)
2. The Ventures – Hawaii Five-O (Nookie Edwards; 1968)
3. Aretha Franklin – Day Dreaming (1973)
4. Edwin Hawkins Singers – Oh Happy Day (1969)
5. Blind Boys of Alabama – Way Down In The Hole (Clarence Fountain, 2001)
6. Tony Joe White – I’ve Got A Thing About You Baby (1972)
7. Roy Clark – Thank God And Greyhound (1970)
8. Vic Damone – It Had To Be You (1962)
9. Edith Piaf & Charles Aznavour – Le bleu de tes yeux (1953)
10. Louis Prima & Keely Smith – That Old Black Magic (1958)
11. Hugh Masekela – Thuma Mina (Send Me) (2006)
12. Denise LaSalle – Making A Good Thing Better (1973)
13. The Temptations – I Can’t Get Next To You (Dennis Edwards; 1969)
14. James Brown – Make It Funky (Part 1) (Jabo Starks, 1971)
15. Avicii – Hey Brother (2014)
16. Bay City Rollers – Summerlove Sensation (Duncan Longmuir; 1974)
17. The Cranberries – Dreams (Dolores O’Riordan; 1992)
18. The Fall – Victoria (Mark E. Smith; 1988)
19. Motörhead – Beer Drinkers & Hell Raisers (‘Fast’ Eddie Clarke; 1980)
20. France Gall – La minute de silence (1996)

https://rapidgator.net/file/396380aa161af29f203d277c9fd29215/died18.rar.html

Oh, and the people on the cover? Top row (from left): Charles Azanavour, Dennis Edwards, France Gall, Aretha Franklin, Alan Longmuir, Keely Smith. Second row: Tony Joe White, Denise LaSalle, Hugh Masekela, Dolores O’Riordan. Third row: Vic Damone, Edwin Hawkins, Nookie Edwards, ‘Fast’ Eddie Clarke. Bottom row: D.J. Fontana, Avicii, Clarence Fountain, Mark. E. Smith, Jabo Starks, Roy Clark.

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The Joe Osborne Collection

December 17th, 2018 3 comments

 

 

R.I.P. Joe Osborn. There aren’t many rhythm sections that have scored more hits than Joe Osborn on bass, Hal Blaine on drums and Larry Knechtel on keyboards. With Osborn’s death at 81 on Friday, only Blaine is still with us of this particular combination of Wrecking Crew alumni.

Osborn appeared on many of the tracks included in the two volumes of songs featuring the drumming of Hal Blaine (Vol. 1 and Vol. 2), as well as some on the Jim Gordon (Vol. 1 and Vol. 2) and Jim Keltner  (Vol. 1 and Vol. 2) collections.

You will have Osborns basslines many times. Osborne — who was not the only Wrecking Crew bassist — was involved in an astonishing number of hits. They are listed here. Some of them are stone cold classics: California Dreaming and Monday Monday by the Mamas & The Papas, San Francisco by Scott Mackenzie,

Up Up And Away and Wedding Bell Blues by The Fifth Dimension, Gentle On My Mind and By The Time I Get To Phoenix by Glenn Campbell, Cracklin’ Rose by Neil Diamond, Never My Love  and Windy by the Association, Delta Dawn and I Am Woman by Helen Reddy, Midnight Confession by the Grass Roots, Just Dropped In  To See… and Ruby Don’t Take Your Love To Town by Kenny Rogers & The First Edition (and later Roger’s mega hit Lucille), Lonely People and Ventura Highway by America, Dizzy by Tommy Row, Stoney End by Barbra Streisand, Free Electric Band and The Peacemaker by Albert Hammond, and many more.

But his major associations were with Simon & Garfunkel (with Blaine and Knechtel, he played on most of their big hits, including Bridge Over Troubled Water and The Boxer), Johnny Rivers, the Partridge Family and, especially, the Carpenters. In fact, Osborn continued to work with Richard Carpenters when the duo was on its commercial decline and on veracious projects after Karen’s premature death.

The trio, with other Wrecking Crew luminaries, also played on the original musical soundtrack of The Rocky Horror Show.

After the Wrecking Crew faded away, Osborn played on such classics as England Dan & John Ford Coley’s I’d Really Love To See You Tonight and We’ll Never Have To Say Goodbye Again, Olivia Newton-John’s Sam, Neil Young’s Rust Never Sleeps album, and in the 1980s on many records by country acts including Merle Haggard and Johnny Cash.

Louisiana-born Osborn started out as a guitar player, even recording as coupler of instrumental singles as part of Jim & Joe. He also wrote a few songs, but really started to attract attention for his bass work with Ricky Nelson, particularly on the hit Travellin’ Man, using the Fender Precision which he had bought in 1958. He used that bass guitar for much of his career.

He died on December 14 after a long battle with pancreatic cancer.

As ever, the mix is timed to fit on a standard CD-R and includes home-picked covers. PW in comments.

1. Jim & Joe – Fireball Mail (1963)
2. Ricky Nelson – Travellin’ Man (1960)
3. P.F. Sloan – The Man Behind The Red Balloon (1966)
4. The Mamas & The Papas – Somebody Groovy (1966)
5. Neil Diamond – Holly Holy (1969)
6. Johnny Rivers – When A Man Loves A Woman (1967)
7. Simon & Garfunkel – The Only Living Boy in New York (1970)
8. Carpenters – It’s Going To Take Some Time (1972)
9. Barbra Streisand – Beautiful (1971)
10. Thelma Houston – I Just Gotta Be Me (1969)
11. Helen Reddy – Delta Dawn (1973)
12. B.W. Stevenson – My Maria (1973)
13. The Dillards – Listen To The Sound (1968)
14. The Everly Brothers – Less Of Me (1968)
15. Neil Young & Crazy Horse – Sail Away (1979)
16. America – Don’t Cross The River (1972)
17. Albert Hammond – The Peacemaker (1973)
18. England Dan & John Ford Coley – I’d Really Like To See You Tonight (1976)
19. Tim Curry – Sweet Transvestite (1974)
20. The 5th Dimension – California Soul (1968)
21. The Monkees – Valleri (1968)
22. The Association – Windy (1967)
23. Partridge Family – I Woke Up In Love This Morning (1971)
24. The Grass Roots – Where Were You When I Needed You (1966)
25. Laura Nyro – Save The Country (1969)
26. Glen Campbell and The Wrecking Crew – I’m Not Gonna Miss You (2015)

GET IT!

 

Previous session musicians’ collection:
The Hal Blaine Collection Vol. 1
The Hal Blaine Collection Vol. 2
The Jim Gordon Collection Vol. 1
The Jim Gordon Collection Vol. 2

The Ricky Lawson Collection Vol. 1
The Ricky Lawson Collection Vol. 2
The Jim Keltner Collection Vol. 1
The Jim Keltner Collection Vol. 2
The Bernard Purdie Collection Vol. 1
The Bernard Purdie Collection Vol. 2
The Steve Gadd Collection Vol. 1
The Steve Gadd Collection Vol. 2
The Steve Gadd Collection Vol. 3
The Larry Carlton Collection
The Bobby Keys Collection
The Louis Johnson Collection
The Bobby Graham Collection
The Ringo Starr Collection

Categories: Mix CD-Rs, Session Players Tags:

Any Major 1980s Christmas

December 13th, 2018 7 comments

 

This year it’s the 1980s in Any Major Dude’s yulecastle (following the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s), with the obvious and lesser known  Christmas songs represented.

It was a debate whether or not to leave out Fairytale Of New York or Last Christmas, but how could it be a 1980s Christmas without them. One ‘80s Christmas song not featuring here, however, is the best-selling of them all: Do They Know It’s Christmas. Good intentions aside, the lyrics are atrociously condescending. Do the people of Ethiopia know it’s Christmas? Given that Christianity in Ethiopia precedes the evangelisation of most of Europe, I think they do.

But Do They Know It’s Christmas reminds me of this following, doubtless true story.

It was one year around Christmas time when U2 had lined up a series of big charity gigs. They got together on the day of the first gig to soundcheck and Bono noticed that The Edge was looking a bit sickly. “What’s the matter, The Edge?” Bono asked The Edge.

“Ah, look, it’s nothing, Bono,” the guitarist replied. “It’s just… you know that Japanese promotional tour we did last week, right? I think I picked up something. Maybe some kind of flu, but I’m feeling pretty bad.”

“Well, The Edge,” replied Bono, “if you want to pull out of the gigs, you just say so.” But The Edge shook his head. “No way Bono. These gigs are important. Think of the children, not my aching guts.”

“Aye, that’s the spirit, The Edge,” said Bono. That night U2 took to the stage. They played all the hits and the crowd was well into it. For a big climax, because it’s for charity and around Christmas, they performed “Do They Know It’s Christmas”. Bono was emoting, Adam was running basslines, Larry was merrily drumming along. Suddenly The Edge began to feel very ill indeed. He turned, dropped his guitar, and started running towards the back of the stage. But he didn’t quite make it and threw up all over Larry Mullen Jr and his drumkit.

“Jaysis, The Edge!” Larry yelled. “My brand-new drums!” The Edge was mortified. “Eh, sorry Larry, I couldn’t help myself. It’s this flu, you know.”

Next night The Edge was back up there on stage, riffing away. The gig was going really well, but then as “Do They Know It’s Christmas” started, The Edge began to feel sick again. He started to run off the stage but to no avail. As he got to the bassist’s spot, he puked all over Adam Clayton.

“Me best leather waistcoat,” wailed Adam Clayton. “The Edge, you’re more beast than man!” The Edge apologised profusely but Bono was furious after the gig. “The Edge, you’ve gone too far this time. I’ve just been on the phone to Sting, he can take your place tomorrow.”

The Edge was almost in tears. “Please, Bono no, this gig means so much to me. It’s for the children. I know I’ve got it all out my system now. I’ll be fine tomorrow, I promise, you have to let me play.”

‘OK, The Edge, one last chance,” Bono said. “But I warn you, any more antics like the last two nights, then that’s it, you’re out of U2.” The Edge promised to be good.

 

The Edge, recovering from a bad flu, and Bonzo.

 

The next day The Edge took lots of vitamins and come evening he was feeling fine. The gig was amazing, even Discotheque was sounding alright. Bono was pleased, Adam’s new waistcoast looked good, Larry’s drums were sparkling clean, The Edge was happy.

They started Do They Know It’s Christmas, and Bono moved over to stand shoulder to shoulder with his pal and really belted out the tune.

Suddenly The Edge didn’t feel too good. His face was contorting, he struggled manfully, but it was no use. He turned to Bono with a look of desperation and suddenly hacked up an enormous greenie, right into Bono’s face.

The song stopped. The Edge was paralysed with horror. “Bono, I can explain, I’m truly sorry, you can’t believe how sorry I am,” The Edge stammered.

Bono wiped the snot off, turned to Edge and said: “Well, tonight thank God it’s phlegm instead of spew.”

On that note: HAVE YOURSELF A  MERRY LITTLE CHRISTMAS!

As ever, the mix is timed to fit on a standard CD-R and includes home-grogged covers. PW in comments.

1. Bruce Springsteen – Santa Claus Is Coming To Town (1985)
2. Bryan Adams – Christmas Time (1985)
3. Vince Vance & The Valiants – All I Want For Christmas Is You (1989)
4. Ramones – Merry Christmas (I Don’t Want To Fight Tonight) (1987)
5. The Waitresses – Christmas Wrapping (1981)
6. Prince and the Revolution – Another Lonely Christmas (1984)
7. Gap Band – This Christmas (1984)
8. Alexander O’Neal – My Gift To You (1988)
9. Ray Charles – That Spirit Of Christmas (1985)
10. The Pogues with Kirsty MacColl – Fairytale Of New York (1987)
11. Pretenders – 2000 Miles (1983)
12. Fay Lovsky – Christmas Was A Friend Of Mine (1981)
13. Chris Rea – Driving Home For Christmas (1986)
14. Queen – Thank God It’s Christmas (1984)
15. Wham! – Last Christmas (1984)
16. Mavis Staples – Christmas Vacation (1989)
17. Ray Parker Jr. – Christmas Time Is Here (1984)
18. Run DMC – Christmas In Hollis (1987)
19. Max Headroom – Merry Christmas Santa Claus (1986)
20. Shakin’ Stevens – Merry Christmas Everyone (1985)

https://rapidgator.net/file/0107d5a759a62e8648d208e83b2f7190/XM80.rar.html

 

More Christmas Mixes
Any Major Christmas Favourites
Any Major 1970s Christmas
Any Major 1960s Christmas
Any Major 1950s Christmas
Christmas Mix, Not For Mother
Any Major X-Mas Mix
Any Major Christmas Pop Vol. 1
Any Major Christmas Pop Vol. 2
Any Major Christmas Carols (in pop)
Any Major Christmas Bells
Any Major Smooth Christmas
Any Major Christmas Soul Vol. 1
Any Major Christmas Soul Vol. 2
Any Major Christmas Soul Vol. 3
Any Major Doop Wop Christmas
Any Major Rhythm & Blues Christmas
Any Major Country Christmas Vol. 1
Any Major Country Christmas Vol. 2
Any Major Acoustic Christmas
Christmas In Black & White Vol. 1
Christmas In Black & White Vol. 2
Christmas In Black & White Vol. 3
Song Swarm: Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer

Or all in one place

Categories: X-Mas Tags:

Any Major Doo Wop X-Mas

December 6th, 2018 12 comments

 

This Christmas we’re going doo wopping, with The Cameos, Marquees, Marshalls, Moonglows, Penguins, Ravens, Dominoes, Voices, Marcels, Uniques, Melodeers, Martells, Larks, Orioles, Falcons , Ebonaires, Ebb Tides, Blue Notes, Valentines, Sherwoods, Playboys and some of their pals.

I had written up a nice post about the stories of some of these acts — and it somehow disappeared. So, here is the mix without a history lesson.

Companion mixes to go with this would be Any Major ’50s Christmas and ’60s Christmas, Any Major R&B Christmas, and Christmas in Black & White Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 and Vol. 3.

Happy Advent season! And if your Dutch, Belgian or German, happy Saint Nicholas Day!

As always, the mix is timed to fit on a standard CD-R and includes home-shoo-da-ba-da-ho-ho-hoed covers (which, I must confess, I’m quite pleased with). PW in comments.

1. The Cameos – Merry Christmas (1957)
2. The Marquees – Santa’s Done Got Hip (1959)
3. The Marshalls – Mr.Santa’s Boogie (1951)
4. The Moonglows – Hey Santa Claus (1953)
5. La Fets & Kitty – Christmas Letter (1957)
6. The Five Keys – It’s Christmas Time (1951)
7. The Penguins – Jingle Jangle (1957)
8. The Ravens – White Christmas (1958)
9. Billy Ward & The Dominoes – Christmas In Heaven (1963)
10. The Voices – Santa Claus Baby (1957)
11. Frankie Lymon – It’s Christmas Once Again (1957)
12. Lonnie & The Crisis – Santa Town USA (1961)
13. The Marcels – Don’t Cry For Me This Christmas (1961)
14. The Uniques – Merry Christmas Darling (1963)
15. The Platters – Santa Claus Is Comin To Town (1963)
16. The Melodeers – Rudolph The Red Nosed Reindeer (1960)
17. The Martells – Rockin’ Santa Claus (1959)
18. Oscar McLollie and his Honey Jumpers – God Gave Us Christmas (1955)
19. The Larks – All I Want For Christmas (1951)
20. Sonny Til & The Orioles – O Holy Night (1950)
21. The Ebonaires – Love For Christmas (1955)
22. The Cashmeres – I Believe In St. Nick (1960)
23. The Drifters – I Remember Christmas (1964)
24. The Dynamics – Christmas Plea (1962)
25. The Falcons – Can This Be Christmas (1957)
26. Nino & The Ebb Tides – The Real Meaning Of Christmas (1958)
27. Blue Notes – Winter Wonderland (1960)
28. The Valentines – Christmas Prayer (1957)
29. The Playboys – The Night Before Christmas (1963)
30. The Sherwoods – Happy Holiday (1961)

https://rapidgator.net/file/7b7bd796c8c01c635750415d3d3da16a/XMDwop.rar.html

More Christmas Mixes
Any Major Christmas Favourites
Any Major 1970s Christmas
Any Major 1960s Christmas
Any Major 1950s Christmas
Christmas Mix, Not For Mother
Any Major X-Mas Mix
Any Major Christmas Pop Vol. 1
Any Major Christmas Pop Vol. 2
Any Major Christmas Carols (in pop)
Any Major Christmas Bells
Any Major Smooth Christmas
Any Major Christmas Soul Vol. 1
Any Major Christmas Soul Vol. 2
Any Major Christmas Soul Vol. 3
Any Major Rhythm & Blues Christmas
Any Major Country Christmas Vol. 1
Any Major Country Christmas Vol. 2
Any Major Acoustic Christmas
Christmas In Black & White Vol. 1
Christmas In Black & White Vol. 2
Christmas In Black & White Vol. 3
Song Swarm: Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer

Or all in one place

Categories: Mix CD-Rs, X-Mas Tags:

In Memoriam – November 2018

December 3rd, 2018 3 comments

For a change, this month’s In Memoriam comes to you on a Monday. On Thursday the first of this year’s two Christmas mixes will run, and in between the annual round-up of the year’s most significant music deaths. And, as always, the year will end with a disco mix for your New Year’s Eve celebrations (at a party or to boogie down in the kitchen as you prep your TV snacks). Here, then, are November’s dead and their music.

To American country fans, and general TV viewers, Roy Clark was a household name as the presenter, alongside Buck Owens, of the long-running variety show Hee Haw. A recording artist in his own right, Clark welcomed many country artists to “Kornfield Kounty”. Elvis was a fan and wanted to appear on the show, but was afraid that Colonel Parker would nix the idea. Although Hee Haw was popular in urban centres, in 1971 TV execs tried to be hip to the youth and cancelled a bunch of shows aimed at rural and older demographics. These included Hee Haw and The Lawrence Welk Show, as well as series such as The Beverly Hillbillies and Green Acres). Welk and Hee Haw continued with much success in syndication, but Clark made his displeasure known by recording a novelty song titled The Lawrence Welk-Hee Haw Counter-Revolution Polka.

The French composer Francis Lai wrote a huge number of film scores, and in that pursuit he came up with two tunes which wormed themselves into every ear of their generation: the love theme of Love Story, which became a hit for Andy Williams as Where Do I Begin, and before that theme of A Man And A Woman, which you’ll know even if you can’t place the title. Lai also wrote many songs for the likes of Edith Piaf, Yves Montand or Mireille Mathieu.

Another track that might feature in the Originals series is Jamaican rocksteady band The Melodians’ The Rivers Of Babylon, which became a huge hit in the 1978 cover by Boney M. Of course, for reggae fans it is hardly a lesser-known original: in The Melodians’ hands, it was an anthem for the Rastafari movement when it came out in 1970. Its use on the soundtrack of the 1972 film The Harder They Come helped introduce reggae to a broader audience. Even before that, they were one of the pioneering bands to make the transition from ska to rocksteady. With the death of Trevor McNaughton at 77, all three original members of the band are now dead. As the last survivor, McNaughton released an album with a new version of The Melodians only last year.

Just a day after his original version on the Barry Manilow hit Mandy appeared on the 1970s Originals mix, Scott English died at 81. In the 1960s he had co-written the American Breed hit Bend Me, Shape Me, The Animals’ Help Me Girl and the Jeff Beck hit Hi Ho Silver Lining, which he also produced (and which is still going to feature in the Originals series). The man with the most self-contradictory of names also produced Thin Lizzy’s eponymous 1971 debut album.

As an orchestra should, the Electric Light Orchestra featured strings. And most prominent among those was the cello, played from 1973 to 1978 by Hugh McDowell. The classically trained cellist — an alumnus of the Yehudi Menuhin School who made his professional debut at the age of 11 — also was a dab hand at the new-fangled Moog synth, which he played with Roy Wood’s Wizzard. Later he got into computer programming, writing several music-related programmes.

You might not guess it, but later 1990s pop/hip-hop outfit LFO, best known perhaps for their 1999 hits Summer Girls and Girl On TV sold more than 4 million CDs worldwide. Hearing these songs again now evokes another age, which is a strange sensation for somebody like me who is still coming to terms that were living in the 21st century. This came to mind with the death of 41 of LFO singer Devin Lima. Born Harold Lima, he had been as hardware store worker when the Lyte Funkie Ones roped him in to be their new singer — and Lima promptly renamed them LFO. After LFO split in 2002 (they reformed a couple of times later), Lima had a solo project and formed a few bands, but nothing replicated LFO’s brief but of great success. Lima as diagnosed with stage four cancer last year. On 21 November he lost that fight.

Vinny Mazetta, 83, saxophone player, on Oct. 14
The Five Satins – In The Still Of The Night (1956, on saxophone)

Ray Owen, member of British blues rock band Juicy Lucy, on Oct. 31
Juicy Lucy – Who Do You Love? (1969)

Monique Wakelin, keyboardist of Australian rock band iNsuRge, announced Oct. 31
iNsuRge – I Hate Stupid People (1998)

Dave Rowland, 74, lead singer of country trio Dave & Sugar, on Nov. 1
Dave & Sugar – I’m Knee Deep In Loving You (1977)

Tom Diaz, 32, Indie singer and musician, on Nov. 1

Roy Hargrove, 49, jazz trumpeter, on Nov. 2
Roy Hargrove Quintet – Once Forgotten (1994)
John Mayer – Waiting On The World To Change (2006, on horns)

Josh Fauver, 38, bassist of indie band Deerhunter, on Nov. 2

Glenn Schwartz, 78, rock guitarist, on Nov. 2
Pacific Gas And Electric – Bluesbuster (1969)

Maria Guinot, 73, Portuguese singer, on Nov. 3

Tama Renata, ex-member New Zealand reggae band Herbs, on Nov. 4
Herbs – Till We Kissed (1993)

Roman Grinev, 41, Russian jazz-fusion bassist, on Nov. 4

Hugh McDowell, 65, English cellist with ELO, Wizzard, on Nov. 6
Wizzard – Bend Over Beethoven (1973, on Moog, also as writer)
ELO – Evil Woman (1975)

Francis Lai, 86, French film score composer, on Nov. 7
Edith Piaf – Musique A Tout Va (1962, as co-writer)
Francis Lai – Theme From ‘A Man And A Woman’ (1967, also as composer)
Andy Williams – Where Do I Begin (Love Story) (1970, as composer)

Wolfgang Schlüter, 85, German jazz vibraphonist and percussionist, on Nov. 12

Lucho Gatica, 90, Chilean bolero singer and actor, on Nov. 13

Brian Rusike, 62, songwriter and keyboardist with Zimbabwean band Pied Piper, on Nov. 13
Pied Pipers – Lets Work Together (And Build Zimbabwe) (1980)

Sonny Knowles, 86, Irish showband singer, on Nov. 15

Roy Clark, 85, country singer and presenter of TV show Hee Haw, on Nov. 15
Roy Clark – The Tip Of My Fingers (1962)
Roy Clark – The Lawrence Welk-Hee Haw Counter-Revolution Polka (1972)
Roy Clark – Tennessee Saturday Night (1982)

Ivan Smirnov, 63, Russian folk/fusion guitarist, on Nov. 15

Scott English, 81, songwriter and producer, on Nov. 16
Scott English – High On A Hill (1964)
Eric Burdon & The Animals – Help Me Girl (1966, as co-writer)
Scott English – Something’s Missin’ In My Life (1974)

Al James, 72, bass guitarist of British pop band Showaddywaddy, on Nov. 16
Showaddywaddy – Hey Rock n Roll (1974)

Thierry Lalo, 55, French jazz musician, composer and arranger, on Nov. 16

Alec Finn, 74, bouzouki player of Irish folk band De Dannan, on Nov. 16
De Dannan – Coleraine Jig (1981)

Norris Weir, 72, singer of rocksteady band The Jamaicans and gospel singer, on Nov. 16
The Jamaicans – Ba Ba Boom (1967, also as co-writer)

Cyril Pahinui, 68, Hawaiian guitarist and singer, on Nov. 17

Jens Büchner, 49, German pop singer, on Nov. 17

Eddie Reeves, 79, songwriter and record label executive, on Nov. 18
Sonny & Cher – All I Ever Need Is You (1971, as co-writer)

Bill Caddick, 74, English folk singer and guitarist, member of Home Service, on Nov. 19
Bill Caddick – Superman (1986)

Chris Burroughs, 60, singer-songwriter, on Nov. 19

Trevor McNaughton, 77, singer with Jamaican reggae band The Melodians, on Nov. 20
The Melodians – Lay It On (1966)
The Melodians – Rivers Of Babylon (1970)

Eddie C. Campbell, 79, blues musician, on Nov. 20
Eddie C. Campbell – All Nite (1968)

Roy Bailey, 83, English folk singer, on Nov. 20
Roy Bailey – What You Do With What You’ve Got (1992)

Devin Lima, 41, singer of pop band LFO, on Nov. 21
LFO – Summer Girls (1999)

Mike Zero, 47, German punk musician, on Nov. 26

Skip Van Winkle, 74, musician and singer of Teegarden & Van Winkle, on Nov. 27
Teegarden & Van Winkle – God, Love And Rock & Roll (1970)

Johnny Maddox, 91, ragtime pianist and historian, on Nov. 27
Johnny Maddox and The Rhythmasters – Eight Beat Boogie (1953)

Roger Neumann, 77, jazz saxophonist and arranger, on Nov. 28

Gary Haisman, 60, English singer and rapper, on Nov. 28
D. Mob feat. Gary Haisman – We Call It Acieed (1988)

Erik Lindmark, 46, singer-guitarist of death metal band Deeds of Flesh, on Nov. 29

https://rapidgator.net/file/8ba9680728bb37987f379bb761b6ebe8/IM_1811.rar.html!
(PW in comments)

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